In Bloom, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2010

“Voracious Feast,” De Architect #4, April 1, 2010.

Now that we have entered a phase of involuntary fasting, any anxiety that the architect is destined to turn into the marginalized hunger artist of our time, soon to be replaced by an omnivorous beast—be it a construction consortium, plan-buro or engineering mammoth—seems foolish. Never have the dominant systems been so frail. Through the downpour of hubrical debris, an abundance of opportunities emerges. As we free ourselves from the fascination with the stable, the monumental and the explicit, we can […]

Now that we have entered a phase of involuntary fasting, any anxiety that the architect is destined to turn into the marginalized hunger artist of our time, soon to be replaced by an omnivorous beast—be it a construction consortium, plan-buro or engineering mammoth—seems foolish. Never have the dominant systems been so frail. Through the downpour of hubrical debris, an abundance of opportunities emerges. As we free ourselves from the fascination with the stable, the monumental and the explicit, we can start to grasp the elastic nebula our life has become. This sudden moment of sublimation leaves us in a cloud of new ecologies, economies, energies, flows and fantasies ready to be explored. Hybridized infrastructures, bastard typologies and mutant materials form an androgynous modernity. Everything is elastic; footloose we float around in a mist of unstable, but determined, intentions. A shaking, shrinking, and melting planet will persistently force us to cooperate [...]

Now that we have entered a phase of involuntary fasting, any anxiety that the architect is destined to turn into the marginalized hunger artist of our time, soon to be replaced by an omnivorous beast—be it a construction consortium, plan-buro or engineering mammoth—seems foolish. Never have the dominant systems been [...]

Now that we have entered a phase of involuntary fasting, any anxiety that the architect is destined to turn into the marginalized hunger artist of our time, soon to be [...]

Now that we have entered a phase of involuntary fasting, any anxiety that the architect [...]

“The House that Used to Fly,” Arbitaire, #500, March 1, 2010.

As the Narita Express, the train between airport and city, dips under the Sumidagawa River on its journey toward Tokyo Station, it passes a monstrous looking structure; a colossal spaceship on massive piers, festooned with a demonic oculus and lined with pulsing red lights: The Edo-Tokyo Museum. An encounter with this building reminds the awed visitor that Tokyo once was the birthplace of the future. Last year the museum’s architect, Kiyonori Kikutake, marked his 80th birthday by opening up another […]

As the Narita Express, the train between airport and city, dips under the Sumidagawa River on its journey toward Tokyo Station, it passes a monstrous looking structure; a colossal spaceship on massive piers, festooned with a demonic oculus and lined with pulsing red lights: The Edo-Tokyo Museum. An encounter with this building reminds the awed visitor that Tokyo once was the birthplace of the future. Last year the museum’s architect, Kiyonori Kikutake, marked his 80th birthday by opening up another one of his projects, his own house, to a selected group of friends and visitors. Half a century after he built his Sky House, Kikutake and Metabolism—the movement he instigated—both enjoy renewed attention. Kikutake graduated in 1950 from Tokyo’s Waseda University, the same year the Capital Construction Law was passed. Tokyo in the 50’s, bombed and burned during WWII, was a place in turmoil. The government’s decision to centralize reconstruction [...]

As the Narita Express, the train between airport and city, dips under the Sumidagawa River on its journey toward Tokyo Station, it passes a monstrous looking structure; a colossal spaceship on massive piers, festooned with a demonic oculus and lined with pulsing red lights: The Edo-Tokyo Museum. An encounter with [...]

As the Narita Express, the train between airport and city, dips under the Sumidagawa River on its journey toward Tokyo Station, it passes a monstrous looking structure; a colossal spaceship [...]

As the Narita Express, the train between airport and city, dips under the Sumidagawa River [...]

Flockr, Get It Louder, Beijing, China, 2010

Party Wall, Athens, Greece, 2010

Pole Dance, New York, USA, 2010

Sinfonia Varsovia, Warsaw, Poland, 2010