Museum as Process, University of California, Davis, USA, 2016

m.XX, Berlin, Germany, 2016

Future Work, Design Miami, Basel, Switzerland, 2016

Manetti Shrem Museum, Davis, USA, 2016

Passage, Chicago, Illinois, USA, 2015

Versace Showroom, New York, USA, 2015

Tina Kim Gallery, New York, USA, 2015

Site Verrier, Meisenthal, France, 2015

Amant, Brooklyn, New York, USA, 2015

Blueprint at Storefront, New York, USA, 2015

Forecast, Providence, RI, 2014

New Inc, New York, USA, 2014

2040 – The End of Fictionalism, Rotterdam, 2014

Wynwood Gateway Park, Wynwood Miami, 2014

Bad Thoughts, Amsterdam, 2014

Veiled, Aegean Sea, Greece, 2014

ArtA, Arnhem, The Netherlands, 2014

Blueprint, Various, 2014

Dichroicarus, Milan, Italy, 2014

Syracuse Housing, Syracuse, USA, 2014

Spiky, Beijing, China, 2013

BlooM+, Kowloon, Hong Kong, 2013

“Its about time all over again,” Domus #958, January 10, 2013.

Once again, halfway through writing an Op-Ed, a catastrophic flood punishes the earth. The Fukushima tsunami washed over Abstainability, a text I wrote for domusweb in 2011. Now Sandy has purged some of my thoughts on adaptive reuse.  Originally intent on writing about how we, in the pursuit of a “timely” architecture, contemplate sites saturated with extant “stuff”—mostly parts that once aggregated to a near whole—I had drifted towards pondering world heritage, Metabolism and other grand themes. Then Sandy threw me back to more […]

Once again, halfway through writing an Op-Ed, a catastrophic flood punishes the earth. The Fukushima tsunami washed over Abstainability, a text I wrote for domusweb in 2011. Now Sandy has purged some of my thoughts on adaptive reuse.  Originally intent on writing about how we, in the pursuit of a “timely” architecture, contemplate sites saturated with extant “stuff”—mostly parts that once aggregated to a near whole—I had drifted towards pondering world heritage, Metabolism and other grand themes. Then Sandy threw me back to more quotidian contexts, the “stuff” we deal with on a daily basis but never give the consideration it might deserve. After the recent Frankenstorm hit New York, our screens were once again filled with imagery of humanity’s muck swept away by the sea—decrepit roller coasters, rotten boardwalks, corroded pergolas, dilapidated siding, shattered shutters—the junk our current world produces and values. Much was lost, but remarkably enough, the damage to commerce and [...]

Once again, halfway through writing an Op-Ed, a catastrophic flood punishes the earth. The Fukushima tsunami washed over Abstainability, a text I wrote for domusweb in 2011. Now Sandy has purged some of my thoughts on adaptive reuse.  Originally intent on writing about how we, in the pursuit of a “timely” architecture, contemplate [...]

Once again, halfway through writing an Op-Ed, a catastrophic flood punishes the earth. The Fukushima tsunami washed over Abstainability, a text I wrote for domusweb in 2011. Now Sandy has purged some of [...]

Once again, halfway through writing an Op-Ed, a catastrophic flood punishes the earth. The Fukushima [...]

Light and Air, Bristol, UK, 2013

“Workspheres,” January 1, 2013.

The office is no more. We work anywhere, anytime. We don’t even think we are working, we don’t really have professions any longer—just different things we do, sometimes alone, sometimes with others we are connected to, through a myriad of mutating platforms and dynamic structures. We meet, tweet and charette in, lounges, clubs, incubators, shared work spaces, hotdesks, café cars, coffee shops, dropdown benches, skype booths, concentration rooms and hotel lobbies. The flexibility and freedom that used to be limited to […]

The office is no more. We work anywhere, anytime. We don’t even think we are working, we don’t really have professions any longer—just different things we do, sometimes alone, sometimes with others we are connected to, through a myriad of mutating platforms and dynamic structures. We meet, tweet and charette in, lounges, clubs, incubators, shared work spaces, hotdesks, café cars, coffee shops, dropdown benches, skype booths, concentration rooms and hotel lobbies. The flexibility and freedom that used to be limited to executives, now applies to more responsibilities as accounting, bookkeeping, contract writing: all this work is done wherever one wants to be. Work is everywhere but the traditional office. It is not only where we work that has changed. The fundamental notion of what work is has shifted. New terms as playbour, enterprise gamification and hackathons suggest a general ‘ludification’ of work, the merging of leisure and obligation. The worksphere has [...]

The office is no more. We work anywhere, anytime. We don’t even think we are working, we don’t really have professions any longer—just different things we do, sometimes alone, sometimes with others we are connected to, through a myriad of mutating platforms and dynamic structures. We meet, tweet and charette in, [...]

The office is no more. We work anywhere, anytime. We don’t even think we are working, we don’t really have professions any longer—just different things we do, sometimes alone, sometimes with [...]

The office is no more. We work anywhere, anytime. We don’t even think we are working, [...]

3 Lobbies, Shanghai, China, 2012

tiNY, New York, USA, 2012

Museum of Modern Art Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland, 2012

Transhistoria, Queens, USA, 2012

Kukje Gallery—K3, Seoul, South Korea, 2012

Kukje Gallery for MoMA, 2012

“Focusing in the fog,” Domus #958, March 28, 2012.

Our train cuts through a desaturated dawn. Hazy, fleeting images of a carefully constructed landscape flash by in various shades of gray. The track runs perfectly parallel to an unswerving canal. Perpendicular to this connective corridor, endless rows of similar trees rhythmically emerge out of the thick of the mist. More and more signs of a meticulous modern world appear under the sun’s slowly rise. The free newspaper offered at the station declares that people living here are the happiest […]

Our train cuts through a desaturated dawn. Hazy, fleeting images of a carefully constructed landscape flash by in various shades of gray. The track runs perfectly parallel to an unswerving canal. Perpendicular to this connective corridor, endless rows of similar trees rhythmically emerge out of the thick of the mist. More and more signs of a meticulous modern world appear under the sun’s slowly rise. The free newspaper offered at the station declares that people living here are the happiest in the world, yet the mood is sad. Globalization brought quick ecstasy but a draining hangover. The idea of progress has become suspicious. Beliefs are regressive; tastes yearn for long-gone eras. Even architects over here profess a nostalgic modernity, romantically reviving radical schemes from the past. ‘Now that we have seen the future, can we please go back?’ they wonder. Our office, SO–IL, is across the ocean in what once [...]

Our train cuts through a desaturated dawn. Hazy, fleeting images of a carefully constructed landscape flash by in various shades of gray. The track runs perfectly parallel to an unswerving canal. Perpendicular to this connective corridor, endless rows of similar trees rhythmically emerge out of the thick of the mist. [...]

Our train cuts through a desaturated dawn. Hazy, fleeting images of a carefully constructed landscape flash by in various shades of gray. The track runs perfectly parallel to an unswerving [...]

Our train cuts through a desaturated dawn. Hazy, fleeting images of a carefully constructed landscape [...]

Living House Art Museum, Seoul, South Korea, 2012

Benetton Flagship Store, New York, USA, 2012

Frieze Art Fair, New York, USA, 2012

Learning Curves, Esbo, Finland, 2012

Linked, Wulpen, Belgium, 2012

Logan, New York, USA, 2012

Urban Fabrics, Manama, Bahrain, 2012

Whitney Education, New York, USA, 2012

Z33 House for Contemporary Art, Hasselt, Belgium, 2012

Meicang Art District, Shanghai, China, 2011

Tricolonnade, Shenzhen, China, 2011

Meissen, Amersfoort, The Netherlands, 2011

“Abstainability,” Domus, April 20, 2011.

In a brief moment of anxiety, not uncommon in our current role of “Promising Architects,” a condition that allows for the quick recalibration of one’s own position before the “show is on,” I felt we should consider “broadening our appeal.” How can our firm, SO–IL, become more attractive to more clients now that we need to “capitalize on our potential”? I was thinking about our “marketability,” and impressed by the ease with which my peers incorporate Greeniness into their practice. I pondered […]

In a brief moment of anxiety, not uncommon in our current role of “Promising Architects,” a condition that allows for the quick recalibration of one’s own position before the “show is on,” I felt we should consider “broadening our appeal.” How can our firm, SO–IL, become more attractive to more clients now that we need to “capitalize on our potential”? I was thinking about our “marketability,” and impressed by the ease with which my peers incorporate Greeniness into their practice. I pondered on how to develop an attitude towards this irrefutable big issue that calls to be addressed. Should the word “sustainability” jump off our webpages? Should we get certificated by a brand that peddles stamps of approval? Should we become angry? But then I mused on. We, as a profession and as a people, ostensibly need to develop our ability to sustain. But what exactly is it that we should sustain from? When the [...]

In a brief moment of anxiety, not uncommon in our current role of “Promising Architects,” a condition that allows for the quick recalibration of one’s own position before the “show is on,” I felt we should consider “broadening our appeal.” How can our firm, SO–IL, become more attractive to more [...]

In a brief moment of anxiety, not uncommon in our current role of “Promising Architects,” a condition that allows for the quick recalibration of one’s own position before the “show [...]

In a brief moment of anxiety, not uncommon in our current role of “Promising Architects,” [...]

Costa House, Lexington, Kentucky, 2011

Antwerp Province Hall, Antwerp, Belgium, 2011

Pollination, Chengdu, China, 2011

In Bloom, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 2010

“Voracious Feast,” De Architect #4, April 1, 2010.

Now that we have entered a phase of involuntary fasting, any anxiety that the architect is destined to turn into the marginalized hunger artist of our time, soon to be replaced by an omnivorous beast—be it a construction consortium, plan-buro or engineering mammoth—seems foolish. Never have the dominant systems been so frail. Through the downpour of hubrical debris, an abundance of opportunities emerges. As we free ourselves from the fascination with the stable, the monumental and the explicit, we can […]

Now that we have entered a phase of involuntary fasting, any anxiety that the architect is destined to turn into the marginalized hunger artist of our time, soon to be replaced by an omnivorous beast—be it a construction consortium, plan-buro or engineering mammoth—seems foolish. Never have the dominant systems been so frail. Through the downpour of hubrical debris, an abundance of opportunities emerges. As we free ourselves from the fascination with the stable, the monumental and the explicit, we can start to grasp the elastic nebula our life has become. This sudden moment of sublimation leaves us in a cloud of new ecologies, economies, energies, flows and fantasies ready to be explored. Hybridized infrastructures, bastard typologies and mutant materials form an androgynous modernity. Everything is elastic; footloose we float around in a mist of unstable, but determined, intentions. A shaking, shrinking, and melting planet will persistently force us to cooperate [...]

Now that we have entered a phase of involuntary fasting, any anxiety that the architect is destined to turn into the marginalized hunger artist of our time, soon to be replaced by an omnivorous beast—be it a construction consortium, plan-buro or engineering mammoth—seems foolish. Never have the dominant systems been [...]

Now that we have entered a phase of involuntary fasting, any anxiety that the architect is destined to turn into the marginalized hunger artist of our time, soon to be [...]

Now that we have entered a phase of involuntary fasting, any anxiety that the architect [...]

“The House that Used to Fly,” Arbitaire, #500, March 1, 2010.

As the Narita Express, the train between airport and city, dips under the Sumidagawa River on its journey toward Tokyo Station, it passes a monstrous looking structure; a colossal spaceship on massive piers, festooned with a demonic oculus and lined with pulsing red lights: The Edo-Tokyo Museum. An encounter with this building reminds the awed visitor that Tokyo once was the birthplace of the future. Last year the museum’s architect, Kiyonori Kikutake, marked his 80th birthday by opening up another […]

As the Narita Express, the train between airport and city, dips under the Sumidagawa River on its journey toward Tokyo Station, it passes a monstrous looking structure; a colossal spaceship on massive piers, festooned with a demonic oculus and lined with pulsing red lights: The Edo-Tokyo Museum. An encounter with this building reminds the awed visitor that Tokyo once was the birthplace of the future. Last year the museum’s architect, Kiyonori Kikutake, marked his 80th birthday by opening up another one of his projects, his own house, to a selected group of friends and visitors. Half a century after he built his Sky House, Kikutake and Metabolism—the movement he instigated—both enjoy renewed attention. Kikutake graduated in 1950 from Tokyo’s Waseda University, the same year the Capital Construction Law was passed. Tokyo in the 50’s, bombed and burned during WWII, was a place in turmoil. The government’s decision to centralize reconstruction [...]

As the Narita Express, the train between airport and city, dips under the Sumidagawa River on its journey toward Tokyo Station, it passes a monstrous looking structure; a colossal spaceship on massive piers, festooned with a demonic oculus and lined with pulsing red lights: The Edo-Tokyo Museum. An encounter with [...]

As the Narita Express, the train between airport and city, dips under the Sumidagawa River on its journey toward Tokyo Station, it passes a monstrous looking structure; a colossal spaceship [...]

As the Narita Express, the train between airport and city, dips under the Sumidagawa River [...]

Flockr, Get It Louder, Beijing, China, 2010

Party Wall, Athens, Greece, 2010

Pole Dance, New York, USA, 2010

Sinfonia Varsovia, Warsaw, Poland, 2010

“Relations,” The SANAA Studios 2006–2008: Learning from Japan: Single Story Urbanism, October 21, 2009.

Oedipus and Kronos never reached Japan. For in this country it is not inevitable that a young architect instantaneously commits patricide upon leaving his master, nor is it given for a master to impair his “renegade’s” prospects. The opposite is more likely. Japanese architecture can be characterized as a series of continuous flows. Concepts and attitudes are not copied blindly, but adapted, developed, reinterpreted, and modified. The relationship between master and apprentice generally remains respectful and the exchange occurs over […]

Oedipus and Kronos never reached Japan. For in this country it is not inevitable that a young architect instantaneously commits patricide upon leaving his master, nor is it given for a master to impair his “renegade’s” prospects. The opposite is more likely. Japanese architecture can be characterized as a series of continuous flows. Concepts and attitudes are not copied blindly, but adapted, developed, reinterpreted, and modified. The relationship between master and apprentice generally remains respectful and the exchange occurs over time. A collective sense of responsibility toward the profession inspires Japan’s architects to feed an ongoing stream of ideas, passing on knowledge, influence, and interest from one generation to the next. One such stream springs from Kunio Maekawa, himself an apprentice of Le Corbusier and Antonin Raymond, Frank Lloyd Wright’s associate in Japan. An early master of the postwar era, Maekawa is primarily known for his attempts to develop an [...]

Oedipus and Kronos never reached Japan. For in this country it is not inevitable that a young architect instantaneously commits patricide upon leaving his master, nor is it given for a master to impair his “renegade’s” prospects. The opposite is more likely. Japanese architecture can be characterized as a series [...]

Oedipus and Kronos never reached Japan. For in this country it is not inevitable that a young architect instantaneously commits patricide upon leaving his master, nor is it given for [...]

Oedipus and Kronos never reached Japan. For in this country it is not inevitable that [...]

Future Archeology, Los Angeles, USA, 2009

A conversation with Ivan Chermayeff, New York, USA, 2009

“The SANAA Studios, 2006–2008: Learning from Japan, Single Story Urbanism,” Lars Müller Publishers, March 10, 2009

Chermayeff House, Garrison, New York, 2009

Derek Lam Atelier, New York, USA, 2009

Zenith Nadir, New York, USA, 2009

“Cutting Fabric,” Domus #917, September 1, 2008.

The opening of a new Yoji Yamamoto boutique in Manhattan early February went almost unnoticed by the progressively more architecturally minded New York public. The reports of Junya Ishigami’s subtle but brilliant renovation of a triangular one-story brick structure were lost among announcements of yet another luxury high-rise development by a big name architect. Maybe this was because Ishigami’s talent is still unknown outside of Japan—this will change this September when his design for the Japanese pavilion at the Venice […]

The opening of a new Yoji Yamamoto boutique in Manhattan early February went almost unnoticed by the progressively more architecturally minded New York public. The reports of Junya Ishigami’s subtle but brilliant renovation of a triangular one-story brick structure were lost among announcements of yet another luxury high-rise development by a big name architect. Maybe this was because Ishigami’s talent is still unknown outside of Japan—this will change this September when his design for the Japanese pavilion at the Venice Biannual opens—or because its unassuming location—not in the heart but rather on the edge of the increasingly popular Meatpacking District. More likely it is because the intervention takes place on the scale of the city and the architectural detail, deliberately ignoring a scale in between—the scale that is typically considered that of the architectural project, at least in New York. Through a simple but decisive cut, the old building is [...]

The opening of a new Yoji Yamamoto boutique in Manhattan early February went almost unnoticed by the progressively more architecturally minded New York public. The reports of Junya Ishigami’s subtle but brilliant renovation of a triangular one-story brick structure were lost among announcements of yet another luxury high-rise development by [...]

The opening of a new Yoji Yamamoto boutique in Manhattan early February went almost unnoticed by the progressively more architecturally minded New York public. The reports of Junya Ishigami’s subtle [...]

The opening of a new Yoji Yamamoto boutique in Manhattan early February went almost unnoticed [...]

“The Culture of Decongestion,” Domus #915, January 8, 2008.

Be it well documented examples as Detroit and the eastern part of Germany, or lesser known cases elsewhere, vast regions in the world are being left abandoned as a result of globalization, natural disasters and demographic trends. This is not a new phenomenon; however it is accelerating to a pace where it starts to affect the way we should imagine our cities and buildings. Architects love the metropolitan condition, this smoldering melting pot of global cultures. Statistics confirming that within […]

Be it well documented examples as Detroit and the eastern part of Germany, or lesser known cases elsewhere, vast regions in the world are being left abandoned as a result of globalization, natural disasters and demographic trends. This is not a new phenomenon; however it is accelerating to a pace where it starts to affect the way we should imagine our cities and buildings. Architects love the metropolitan condition, this smoldering melting pot of global cultures. Statistics confirming that within decades the bulk of the world population will live in cities make us feverishly propose schemes of insane density; hybrid stackings of all conceivable programs for the millions of new dwellers within this culture of congestion. With few exceptions, current trends suggest a less splendid design scope. The densities will happen. Not planned, but within the informally built shanty mega cities of the developing world. Left to architects are the [...]

Be it well documented examples as Detroit and the eastern part of Germany, or lesser known cases elsewhere, vast regions in the world are being left abandoned as a result of globalization, natural disasters and demographic trends. This is not a new phenomenon; however it is accelerating to a pace [...]

Be it well documented examples as Detroit and the eastern part of Germany, or lesser known cases elsewhere, vast regions in the world are being left abandoned as a result [...]

Be it well documented examples as Detroit and the eastern part of Germany, or lesser [...]

Prato Nursery School, Prato, Italy, 2008

Wedding Chapel, Nanjing, China, 2008

“Beautiful Rough,” Domus #909, January 12, 2007.

The New Museum of Contemporary Art opened its new building in downtown Manhattan to the public in early December. The roughly 6000m², eight-story structure of loosely stacked boxes provides the institution a perfect platform for the advancement of new ideas, in a time and place where they are most needed. The New Museum was born out of a defiant spirit. Marcia Tucker, a strong minded curator, started it in 1977 after being fired at the Whitney Museum in New York, […]

The New Museum of Contemporary Art opened its new building in downtown Manhattan to the public in early December. The roughly 6000m², eight-story structure of loosely stacked boxes provides the institution a perfect platform for the advancement of new ideas, in a time and place where they are most needed. The New Museum was born out of a defiant spirit. Marcia Tucker, a strong minded curator, started it in 1977 after being fired at the Whitney Museum in New York, over a show deemed too provocative. In the following 22 years of directorship at the New Museum, she ran the institution with her founding motto, “Act first, think later—that way you have something to think about.” The museum became a shelter for art shunned elsewhere, because it was thorny, out of fashion or made by non white, non male or non straight artists. Shows were strongly political, infused by her [...]

The New Museum of Contemporary Art opened its new building in downtown Manhattan to the public in early December. The roughly 6000m², eight-story structure of loosely stacked boxes provides the institution a perfect platform for the advancement of new ideas, in a time and place where they are most needed. [...]

The New Museum of Contemporary Art opened its new building in downtown Manhattan to the public in early December. The roughly 6000m², eight-story structure of loosely stacked boxes provides the [...]

The New Museum of Contemporary Art opened its new building in downtown Manhattan to the [...]

“New Sobriety,” January 7, 2002.

A recent interest has developed in the phenomenology of diagrams in mathematics, cognitive science, and architectural theory. Traditionally, the diagram is used as a rational tool for analysis and design in these fields, as an abstract representation of a more complex system. The architecture of Kazuyo Sejima + Ryue Nishizawa / SANAA disregards this absoluteness and shows how subjective utilization of the diagram, as a carrier of graphic qualities, can be stunningly beautiful and Superflat.² The burst of the bubble […]

A recent interest has developed in the phenomenology of diagrams in mathematics, cognitive science, and architectural theory. Traditionally, the diagram is used as a rational tool for analysis and design in these fields, as an abstract representation of a more complex system. The architecture of Kazuyo Sejima + Ryue Nishizawa / SANAA disregards this absoluteness and shows how subjective utilization of the diagram, as a carrier of graphic qualities, can be stunningly beautiful and Superflat.² The burst of the bubble left Japan with an alienating postmodernist architectural landscape of heavily ornamented buildings referring to a future that never came. The ideological mindset, as far as it had been developed in post-war Japan—was left numb. Old paradigms were rendered invalid and yet, new directions had not been set. It was during this time, in 1987, when Kazuyo Sejima—SANAA was established 1995—started her office, on the second floor of a residential building [...]

A recent interest has developed in the phenomenology of diagrams in mathematics, cognitive science, and architectural theory. Traditionally, the diagram is used as a rational tool for analysis and design in these fields, as an abstract representation of a more complex system. The architecture of Kazuyo Sejima + Ryue Nishizawa [...]

A recent interest has developed in the phenomenology of diagrams in mathematics, cognitive science, and architectural theory. Traditionally, the diagram is used as a rational tool for analysis and design [...]

A recent interest has developed in the phenomenology of diagrams in mathematics, cognitive science, and [...]